The Man Behind Prop 35…

On September 17, 2012, in Op-Ed, by adultbizlaw

220px Chris Kelly   Facebook The Man Behind Prop 35... The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the various contributors on this web site does not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of AdultBizLaw.com and Michael Fattorosi nor should they be considered legal advice.

This was written by an anonymous contributor.

There’s a California man who wants adult service provider´s children to be punished as criminals. And he’s putting his money where his mouth is. $1.86 Million of it.

Chris is rich and he’s also what is wrong with American politics.

An Ivy league degreed lawyer who was in the right place at the right time: at Facebook’s meager beginnings with a handful of other employees, Chris now wants to personally direct how U.S. society deals with adult service provider. He intends to do this by spending big money.

He might succeed.

Chris who? Chris KELLY. Lawyer, former Facebook Executive Officer, entrepreneur, bullet dodger, opportunist, and most recently, anti-trafficking children’s rights activist.

As Chief Privacy Officer at Facebook, Kelly amassed his wealth while screwing the pooch on member privacy. Everyone has heard of those serious “Facebook privacy concerns” which the media regularly albeit ambiguously reported on for years. Kelly was the guy at that ship’s helm.

In one particularly embarrassing and potentially devastating debacle, Kelly failed to provide adequate protection against online pedo predators for children using Facebook. The failure was caught by a Law Enforcement sting and a major investigation ensued. Suddenly, Kelly got very serious about the issue. He cooperated extensively with LE, and like a sinner finding Jesus, jumped right on board the holy anti-traffic child sex slavery crusade.

Kelly was able to dodge the bullet on that one and with help spun it into a white hat media “success” along with investigators who initially had the guns pointed at his direction, so-to-speak. After the incident he continued on a path of very publicly crusading against minor sex online. That close-call for failing to protect minors, along with the failed Facebook Beacon program which led to a class action lawsuit against Facebook, pointed Kelly in his white-hat wearing direction in efforts to redeem his reputation while feeding his hunger for power and control. Kelly set his sights on becoming California’s Top Law Enforcement Official.

A regular contributor to the California Democratic Party, Kelly left Facebook and ran for Attorney General of California in the 2010 election. Kelly had no public office experience what-so-ever. Neither did he have any criminal justice experience outside of his own close call. As stated by Kelly’s opponents “his only experience is designing the Facebook privacy policy condemned across the country.” Yet, Kelly, a strong pro-Police growth advocate, sunk $2 Million of his own money into his campaign bid. His bid failed. That was his first big money toss that didn’t hit the bull’s-eye.

With the growing national attention to the idea of children being trafficked into sex slavery continuing to gain traction in the media, it wasn’t long until Kelly again did something rich guys that want political power do: spend more money, and garner more attention for themselves.

Kelly’s founded the Safer California Foundation to bolster his cause (and image) and crusade even louder. Soon partnered up with the child-saving Daphne Phung with California Against Slavery. Ms. Phung had watched a television show about child trafficking and was so moved by injustice, she decided to take action by founding “California Against Slavery in 2009 with the vision that stopping this heinous human rights abuse is the duty of every person.”

Kelly is on the Board of California Against Slavery. The two sibling organizations can be noted in the press and listed together as in “Proposition 35 is a joint partnership of California Against Slavery and Safer California Foundation.” Kelly continued on as an entrepreneur while working develop a strong hand in creating public policy from outside of an elected office.

This brings us to 2012 and Kelly’s next big money target: The Californians Against Sexual Exploitation Act (CASE ACT) aka Proposition 35.

Prop 35 is the current project joint partnership of California Against Slavery and Safer California Foundation. Kelly help draft this over-extending sensationalist piece of potential legislation, and then went on to fund it’s campaign which has racked up over $2 Million so far–$1.86 Million from Chris M. Kelly personally and $162 thousand-plus from Peace Officers Research Assn. of CA; that is roughly 85% & 7.5% of the total campaign budget, respectively.

The oppositional campaign to Prop 35 has virtually nothing to spend to educate the public on this heavily criticized and dismal piece of legislation.

So why is all of this even important?

The CASE Initiative is a bad law. It is not even a law that is needed to fight child sex slavery. It’s a law who’s critics point out will open up to criminalization simply being the child of and being cared for by a adult service provider, or by being the spouse of or a dependent of any adult service provider charged under the law. It creates new ways for police (not the courts in sentencing fines) to seize assets from adult service providers, from their relatives, their friends or associates, and use that money to fund more police work doing the same thing again over.

The list of problems with the law are myriad note critics, yet Prop 35 has major backing of Government figures, political organizations and Police through out the state. After all, no politician want to be called pro-child slavery by opposing it. Even more so, big money talks.

Prop 35 has the backing of Chris Kelly’s big money.

When you “follow the money” on Prop 35, and learn what it will do, you’ll find it is clearly a vehicle to create headline grabbing media events which will serve to bolster the personal and political reputations of those who use it, but notably for its co-creator Chris Kelly, who is poised to become an icon for doing good in the current anti-child trafficing furor.

Perhaps the important aspect to keep in mind about all this is that if passed, Prop 35 would be a groundbreaking law that would devastate adult service providers and their families, bolster Police power and authority, while providing little if any benefit to the public at large in California.

But this is not just a California concern.

Politically speaking, ‘As goes California, so goes the nation.’ The Case Act .org website states one of its primary goals: “Additionally, the Prop 35 will raise awareness and unite Californians to take action. With up to 17 million voters, this will form the largest single movement against human trafficking in the U.S

Prop 35, if passed, will set a dangerous foundation for the rest of the county. This is a law that must be stopped. That is a worthy cause regardless of where you live.

If you want to help stop Prop 35, contact the Erotic Service Providers Legal, Education, and Research Project listed at the bottom.

Related websites:

http://votersedge.org/california/ballot-measures/2012/november/prop-35

http://resistancebehindbars.org/node/307

http://jvanek.wordpress.com/2012/08/14/vote-no-on-prop-35-case-act-requires-careful-consideration/

http://www.thereporter.com/opinion/ci_21281109

http://www.lifeontheswingset.com/12508/vote-no-on-ca-prop-35-this-nov/

Summary of Argument AGAINST Proposition 35:

Proposition 35 actually threatens many innocent people “My son, who served our country in the military and now attends college, could be labeled a human trafficker and have to register as a sex offender if I support him with money I earn providing erotic services.“–Maxine Doogan; Please Vote No.

Contact AGAINST Proposition 35:

Maxine Doogan
ESPLER Project, Inc.
2261 Market Street #548
San Francisco, CA 94114
(415) 265-3302

noonprop35@gmail.com

http://esplerp.org/

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One Response to The Man Behind Prop 35…

  1. ESPLERP says:

    [...] The Man Behind Prop 35…BizLaw Blog Sept 17, 2012 [...]

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